September212014

(Source: madoucesouffrance, via wah-pah)

September162014

nayjayification:

eilowyn1:

theamayasakarutaexperience:

bemusedlybespectacled:

amuseoffyre:

nothingeverlost:

Fourteen years ago, a Death Eater named Bellatrix Lestrange used the Cruciatus Curse on my parents. She tortured them for information, but they never gave in. I’m quite proud to be their son.

This hurts. A lot.

One of the scenes that I will never be able to forget from the book is the scene when they’re at the hospital and Neville’s mother comes and gives him the sweet wrapper. She’s been tortured to insanity, but some part of her, some tiny diamond hard fragment of who she was, smothered by the shattered remains of herself remembers her son enough to want to make him smile.

She gives him a present to make him smile, and you just know Neville took that sweet wrapper home with him and put it in a box with all the other random pieces of rubbish she has given to him over the past 14 years.

This is why Neville’s story makes me hurt much more than Harry. Neville’s parents are still there. He can still see them and touch them, but he can never and will never know what they think of him, of what he has become. But no matter what happens, he will do every damn thing he can to be a man they would be proud of. Even if he’s scared, he will be brave because they were.

Re: Neville will never know what they think of him: it’s interesting that Harry, for all he never knew his parents, interacts with them quite a lot for an orphan. Both the Priori Incantatem spell and the Resurrection Stone let Lily and James talk to Harry. They tell him how brave he is and how proud they are and how much they love him.

Neville gets a bubblegum wrapper.

Fuck. 

Thank you I needed the extra heartbreak on this Tuesday afternoon

(Source: the-padfoots, via tardisrightsactivist)

September142014
“You can’t keep dancing with the devil and ask why you’re still in hell” Something my friend told me the other day (via dolly-kitten)

(Source: sad-theater, via l-esbian)

September52014

ralndrops:

I CANT BREATHE

(via cruel-gurl)

August312014

lollipvps:

But you have to understand that when both my cousin and I came out as bisexual to our great-aunt, she told us we were too young to label ourselves.

You have to understand that both of my brothers are gay and came out to her before the ages of 15. She had absolutely no problem.

My great-aunt is a 69 year old lesbian.

You have to understand that not every aspect of biphobia has to do with homophobia.

(via whos-sherlocked)

6AM

zackisontumblr:

i have 3 moods:

  • skips every song on my ipod
  • lets the music play without interruption
  • plays the same song on repeat for days

(via fellowship-of-the-sherlockians)

August302014
August292014

panicacidide:

Apparently it’s not socially acceptable for a man to invite another man out just for coffee or to go out for a meal, in case it’s perceived as a date. Like it’s fine if you wanna go to the pub and drink beer and have a chat but make it non-alcoholic and suddenly you’re not straight anymore? You can go to the cinema together but ONLY if it’s an action movie. You guys can’t even just go shopping with each other. Oh masculinity, so fragile, so strange. 

(via i-was-so-alone-i-owe-you-so-much)

6PM

beautiesofafrique:

Uganda gay pride party after anti-homosexual law is overturned

Entebbe (Uganda) (AFP) - Dancing and waving rainbow-coloured flags, Ugandan activists held their first gay pride rally Saturday since the overturning of a tough anti-homosexuality law, which authorities have appealed. ”This event is to bring us together. Everyone was in hiding before because of the anti-homosexuality law,” organiser Sandra Ntebi told AFP. "It is a happy day for all of us, getting together,” Ntebi said, noting that police had granted permission for the invitation-only “Uganda Pride” rally. The overturned law, condemned as “abominable” by rights groups but popular among many Ugandans, called for proven homosexuals to be jailed for life.

The constitutional court threw it out on a technicality on August 1, six months after it took effect, and the government swiftly filed an appeal, while lawmakers have signed a petition for a new vote on the bill.

Homosexuality remains illegal in Uganda, punishable by a jail sentence. But it is no longer illegal to promote homosexuality, and Ugandans are no longer obliged to denounce gays to the authorities

Amid music and laughter, activists gathered at botanical gardens on the shores of Lake Victoria, barely a kilometre (half a mile) from the presidential palace at Entebbe, a key town some 35 kilometres from the capital Kampala. ”Some Ugandans are gay. Get over it,” read one sticker a man had pasted onto his face. - ‘Now I have the courage’ -

Ugandan Deputy Attorney General Fred Ruhinda said Saturday that state lawyers had lodged an appeal against the ruling at the Supreme Court, the country’s highest court.

"We are unsatisfied with the court ruling," Ruhinda told AFP. "The law was not intended to victimise gay people, it was for the common good." In their surprise ruling last week, judges said it had been passed without the necessary quorum of lawmakers in parliament. Rights groups said the law triggered a sharp increase in arrests and assaults on members of the country’s lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender community.

Homophobia is widespread in Uganda, where American-style evangelical Christianity is on the rise. Gay men and women face frequent harassment and threats of violence. On Saturday, however, activists celebrated openly.

"Since I discovered I was gay I feared coming out, but now I have the courage after the law was thrown out," Alex Musoke told AFP, one of more than 100 people at the event. One pair of activists waved a rainbow flag with a slogan appealing for people to “join hands” to end the “genocide” of homosexuals. Some wore masks for fear of being identified — Uganda’s tabloid newspapers have previously printed photographs of prominent activists — while others showed their faces openly and wore colourful fancy dress. But activist Pepe Onziema said he and his colleagues would not rest until they were sure the law was gone for good. ”Uganda is giving a bad example, not only to the region but to the world, by insisting on this law,” he said.

"We are Africans, we want to show an African struggle by civil society."

There was little police presence, and no one came to protest the celebration, even if many in the town said they did not approve."This is unbelievable, I can’t imagine being a gay," said motorbike taxi driver William Kamurasi in disgust."It’s a shame to Uganda. Police must stop these activities of the gays."

- Lawmakers demand new vote -

Critics said President Yoweri Museveni signed the law to win domestic support ahead of a presidential election set for 2016, which will be his 30th year in power. But it lost him friends abroad, with several international donors freezing or redirecting millions of dollars of government aid, saying the country had violated human rights and democratic principles.

US Secretary of State John Kerry likened the law to anti-Semitic legislation in Nazi Germany.

Analysts suggest that Museveni secretly encouraged last week’s court ruling as it provided a way to avoid the appearance of caving in to foreign pressure. But gay rights activists warn the battle is not over.

Lawmakers signed a petition calling for a new vote on the bill, and to bypass parliamentary rules that require it be formally reintroduced from scratch — a process that could take years.

Source

(via homosexualpride)

August282014

itsstuckyinmyhead:

Australian Tumblr Photoset #13

Want to see more?

American photoset #12 

(via presidentofthecheetahclub)

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